Cherry Fun Facts

  • George Washington never cut really cut down a cherry tree. This myth was written by Mason Locke Weems in a biography of President Washington as a way to illustrate his integrity and honesty. So, it seems that Washington never cut down that cherry tree in his father’s yard…honestly!
  • Japanese cherry blossom trees don’t produce fruit and, instead, are mostly ornamental.
  • While there are over 1,000 (yes, 1,000!) cherry varieties, they are categorized into two main types: sweet and tart. And, of these, only about 20% are used in commercial products.
  • Sweet cherries are most commonly grown in California, Oregon, and Washington and Oregon while the tart varieties are mostly grown in Michigan and Wisconsin.
  • Tart cherries are more often used in baking because they hold their shape better than their sweeter cousins and the tartness allows bakers to modify recipes for preferred level of sweetness.
  • Cherries are believed to have been around since the Stone Age! Archaeologists have discovered fossilized cherry pits in prehistoric caves throughout Europe and Asia.
  • Cherries plantings are believed to have spread through Europe thanks to Roman soldiers. Cherries were ration to Roman soldier and, as they traversed the land, their discarded pits germinated into trees
  • While several varieties were already present in North America, including black cherries, many other cherry varieties first made their way to the United States with Europeans settling the land in the 1600s.
  • A typical cherry tree produces 7000 cherries.
  • Bing cherries are not named for popular films star, Bing Crosby. Rather, they are named after an orchard foreman who helped develop the delicious red varietal.
  • The world record for cherry pit spitting is said to close to 100 feet!